2022 Panel at SIOE Conference

ALUMNI PRESENT PANEL AT CONFERENCE OF
SOCIETY FOR INSTITUTIONAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL ECONOMICS
June 24, 2022
University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Panel chair Lee Benham talks with presenter Laetitia Renee

Workshop alumni Andrew Bibler, Jun Hyung Kim, Laëtitia Renée, and Yang Song presented papers at a session on education and society at the 2022 SIOE conference. Mary Shirley was the organizer, Lee Benham was the chair, and John Nye was the commentator. Benham and Renée attended in person; the others participated via Zoom.

Andrew Bibler
Andrew Bibler
Jun Hyung Kim
Jun Hyung Kim
Laëtitia Renée
Laëtitia Renée
Yang Song
Yang Song
John Nye
John Nye


ABSTRACTS BY THE PANEL

The Implications of School Lotteries for Neighborhood Crime
Andrew Bibler
University of Nevada, Las Vegas
Stephen Billings, University of Colorado Boulder
Stephen Ross, University of Connecticut

School choice lotteries are an important tool for increasing access to high quality public schools. There is strong evidence that high quality public schools have large academic and behavioral benefits due in large part to their peer environment (Deming 2011, Cullen, Jacob, and Levitt 2006). One element of school lotteries that has not been considered is how neighborhood peer relationships change as individuals are admitted to non-neighborhood schools. We examine the effect of school choice lotteries on the criminal activity of non-lottery students, estimating whether students are more or less likely to face future arrest if their neighborhood peers are admitted via lottery to a different school. We estimate the effects of peer displacement using three cohorts of rising middle school students in Charlotte-Mecklenburg school district, comparing the outcomes for non-lottery students and using variation in the proportion of lottery applicants form their neighborhood who win the lottery to attend a different school.


Effects of Childhood Peers on Personality Skills
Jun Hyung Kim
Jinan University
Shuaizhang Feng, Jinan University
Zhe Yang, Jinan University

Despite extensive literature on peer effects, the role of peers on personality skill development remains poorly understood. We fill this gap by investigating the effects of having disadvantaged primary school peers, generated by random classroom assignment and parental migration for employment. We find that having disadvantaged peers significantly lowers conscientiousness, agreeableness, emotional stability, and social skill. The implied effects of a 10–15 percentage point change in the classroom proportion of disadvantaged peers are comparable to the effects of popular early childhood interventions. Furthermore, we find suggestive evidence that these effects are driven by the peers’ personality skills.


The Long-Term Effects of Financial Aid and Career
Education: Evidence from a Randomized Experiment

Laëtitia Renée
McGill University

I study the effects of the Future to Discover Project, a randomized experiment in which Canadian high school students were either invited to participate in career planning workshops or were made eligible for an $8,000 college grant. By matching the experimental data to post-secondary institution records and income tax files, I am able to examine the effects of the interventions on college enrollment, graduation, and earnings in adulthood. I show that the career education intervention greatly improved students’ outcomes in the long run by improving academic matching. In contrast, the college grant had no long-term monetary benefits despite increasing college enrollment, which is consistent with classical models of human capital investment in the absence of credit constraints. My findings suggest that informational frictions and behavioral obstacles—rather than financial constraints—represent the primary barrier to four-year college enrollment faced by low-income students. And that they explain a large part of the gap in four-year college enrollment between high- and low-income students.


Gender Differences in Reactions to Failure in High-Stakes Competition: Evidence from the National College Entrance Exam Retakes
Yang Song
Colgate University
Ziteng Le, UCSB
Le Kang, Peking University
Peng Zhang, CUHK Shenzhen

We document gender differences in reactions to failure in the National College Entrance Exam, an extremely high-stakes exam that solely determines college admission outcomes for almost all teenagers in China. Using unique administrative data in Ningxia Province and a regression-discontinuity design, we find that students who score just below the tier-2 university cutoff have an eight percentage point higher probability of retaking the exam in the next year, and that retaking improves exam performance substantially. However, the increase in retake probability when confronting the failure of scoring just below the cutoff is more pronounced for men than for women (11 percentage points vs. 5.5 percentage points). The gender disparity in the tendency to retake has important implications for exam performance, college enrollment, and labor market outcomes.